Karate 1.0: Parameter of an Ancient Martial Art

15one of the most comprehensive, and demystifying studies on the enigmatic parameters of primordial Karate, this work intrigues readers with rich detail and insights into this ancient combat traditions, the pride of Okinawa.

KARATE 1.0: Parameter of an Ancient Martial Art. Düsseldorf 2013, by Andreas Quast.

cover (4)

Karate 1.0 front cover

  • Pages: xxvii, 502 pp.
  • Language: English.
  • Hardcover binding in green linen material with gold foil stamping, size 8.25″ x 10.75″ (20.95cm x 27.31cm).
  • Full-color dust jacket in matte finish.
  • Inside: black and white printing on cream archival paper (60# weight). White exterior paper (80# weight).
  • Forewords by Patrick McCarthy, Miguel Da Luz, Cezar Borkowski, Jesse Enkamp, Dr. Julian Braun, Soke Leif Hermansson, and Dr. phil. Heiko Bittmann.
  • All copies ship from the United States.
  • Price: $75.00.

Only the highest quality both in content and production: get it now from Lulu.com!

Read the review by the experts:

04description:
Okinawa was formerly known as the Ryūkyū Kingdom. This island kingdom was situated between China and Japan, the two giants in the ancient Asian world order. Involved for centuries in maritime trade, tribute, diplomacy and war, it became variously known as the peaceful kingdom, the islands of longevity, and the land of propriety. Over the course of five centuries, within its encapsulated maritime sphere, unique forms of martial traditions emerged. Today these are known as Karate and Kobudō, the pride of the Okinawans, and world martial arts enjoyed by millions of people around the globe.

Karate 1.0 was also covered in the Okinawa Karate News 沖縄空手通信, No. 91, 2014/01 issue.

The university libraries of Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich as well as of the world’s largest sports university – the German Sport University Cologne – added copies of Karate 1.0 to their inventory.

Yet, factual details about the history of these martial traditions largely remained shrouded in mystery to this day. As the result of the author’s exclusive and trailblazing research, which started two decades ago with a white belt at a friend’s dōjō, KARATE 1.0 now bears witness to the myriad headwaters of modern day Karate and Kobudō.

This masterpiece represents the results of nearly twenty years the author has invested in demystifying the convoluted genealogy of Karate. By conducting interviews around the globe and sifting through mountains of primary and secondary research, he puts the fighting arts and related-persons into a new historical perspective.

Karate 1.0 sold worldwide to Okinawa, Japan, the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, Ireland, the UK, Germany, Spain, Belgium, Austria, France, the Netherlands, Italy, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Switzerland, and Spain.

The central theme of this work is the search for causal triggers of a holistic system of unarmed and armed martial traditions. By analysing the origin and transformation of the military and security organization of the Ryūkyū Kingdom, the author identified the superordinate security related royal government organizations and functions responsible. In addition he detected hundreds of martial artists active during Okinawa’s old kingdom era who otherwise would have remained unnoticed in Karate research and oral tradition.

In this way describing the enigmatic parameters of the Ryūkyū Kingdom’s ancient fighting arts, or KARATE 1.0, a common historical basis of the countless fragmentary traditions of modern Karate and Kobudō was discovered.

KARATE 1.0: Parameter of an Ancient Martial Art” should be embraced by the international Budō community and enjoy the recognition and success it so richly deserves.

03cover Art:

The sword hilt on the front cover is a scetch of the Chōganemaru sword. It once belonged to the mysterious King of Nakijin, Han’anchi. He was defeated by Shō Hashi, who took the sword. Afterwards it had been handed down within the royal Shō family of Ryūkyu for six centuries. On the cover it is meant as a symbol of royal authority rather than a weapon.

Did you know: Karate 1.0 for the first time includes ALL accepted written historical sources on Karate and Kobudō related martial arts of the kingdom.

It is also emblematic for the foreign influences. And it stands for the “Ryukyu Nutshell” in which the martial arts emerged, developed, and countinuously were updated. The “Ryukyu Nutshell” is the idea that the royal government of Ryūkyu basically remained in a constant form since the era of Shō Shin, although adjustments were taken over the centuries.

Karate 1.0 back cover

Karate 1.0 back cover

On the back cover is an artistic drawing of the character , i.e. the moral principle of justice, duty, and truth as the very basis of a martial “path”. Added to it is the caption “Go! Go! Go! Go!”. This is an allusion to the fact that the path should be proactively walked. BTW, is not the aim, but kokoro is. 

Finally, on the cover flips are found the characters Bun and Bu, that is scholarship and the art of war, which are considered to have existed in unitas. The reason for this is that in feudal times civil and military questions were deeply associated. This can be seen in the Sappōshi missions from China to Ryūkyū. It can also be seen in the era of Satsuma control. And it was also manifest in the government organization of the Ryūkyū Kingdom.

05expert ratings:

“KARATE 1.0 will compel you to rethink what is currently known about the historical and cultural background for the art that brings us all together … KARATE 1.0 is destined to become a future classic and a MUST for the bookshelves of every serious Karate-ka. I am SO EXCITED about this project and hope you will be, too.” – Patrick McCarthy, Hanshi 9th Dan, Australia

“This masterpiece represent the results of the author’s nearly twenty years of studies on the history of karate and is a fantastic source of information with its encyclopedic-like details about not only karate, but Ryukyuan history and culture.” – Miguel Da Luz, Okinawa Traditional Karate Liaison Bureau

“Andreas Quast has penned what I humbly believe will become the definitive book on Ryukyuan history and its parallel effect on the fighting traditions of the Nantou Islands.” – Cezar Borkowski, Hanshi 9th Dan, Canada

“When it comes to exploring the ancient martial arts of the Ryukyus, few people have the zealousness and grit of Andreas Quast.” – Jesse Enkamp, Karatepreneur, Sweden

“Andreas Quast’s contribution on the history of martial arts on the Ryukyu Islands is even more delightful.” – Dr. Julian Braun, Germany

“I have always been impressed with Mr Quast’s vast knowledge, acquired in many years of research, about the history of Karate and Kobudo.” – Soke Leif Hermansson, 10th Dan Hanshi, Sweden

“The book not only sheds more light on the history of the art, but also serves as a must-read for any martial arts enthusiast who wishes to acquire a deeper understanding of the origins, and the development, of Karatedo.” – Dr. phil. Heiko Bittmann, Kanazawa, Japan

“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.” ― Søren Kierkegaard 

Karate 1.0 cover flip 1

Karate 1.0 cover flip 2

 

Veröffentlicht unter Books, Unknown Ryukyu | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , , , | Kommentare deaktiviert

The Afuso-ryū of Classical Ryukyuan Music

01afuso-ryū 安冨祖流 is one of the three schools of classical Ryūkyūan music. The other two schools are the Tansui-ryū and the Nomura-ryū.

The logo represents a stylized Japanese "a" in katakana, standing for Afuso. It was designed in 1960 by Sueyoshi Ankyū (1904-1981)

The logo represents a stylized Japanese “a” in katakana, standing for Afuso. It was designed in 1960 by Sueyoshi Ankyū (1904-1981)

Yakabi Pēchin Chōki (1716-1775) was a close associate of King Shō Kei (1700-1752) and had a great musical talent as a teacher of nō. Yakabi reformed the Ryūkyūan Sanchin music by using his knowledge and experience obtained through nō drama, under consideration of old Ryukyu chants, as well as as by incorporating the teachings of Tansui Uēkata (1623-1683) as handed down by each of the masters Takushi, Shinzato, and Terukina. Yakabi added new compositions and for the first time in Ryūkyū used Chinese musical tabulature. In this era Ryūkyūan classical music was called Tō-ryū. His teachings were handed down to Toyohara Satonushi Pēchin and to Nakada Satonushi Pēchin.

Sueyoshi Ankyū (1904-1981) designed the "Monument of the Ancestor of Music" of the Afuso-ryū of classical Ryukyuan music.

Sueyoshi Ankyū (1904-1981) designed the “Monument of the Ancestor of Music” of the Afuso-ryū of classical Ryukyuan music.

Toyohara in turn taught the great musical talent Chinen Sekkō (1761-1828). Chinen examined the musical scores collected by Yakabi, corrected and modified various parts, added his own works like kafū (flower breeze) and others. In this way he completed the musical score collection called kunkunshi, which is a unique Okinawan tabulature.

sanchinChinen was followed by his student Afuso Pēchin Seigen (1785-1865), the actual founder of the Afuso-ryū. Afuso’s successor was Amuro Pēchin, who in turn taught Kin Ryōjin (1873-1936), who laid the foundation for the current Afuso-ryū: In 1927 the Afuso-ryū Genseikai was established with Kin Ryōjin at its center. It is said that 240 songs for the Sanchin have been handed down.

The author at the Monument of the Afuso-ryū of classical Ryukyuan music close to the Okinawa Prefectural Library in Naha.

The author at the Monument of the Afuso-ryū close to the Okinawa Prefectural Library in Naha. 2008/2.

Veröffentlicht unter Unknown Ryukyu | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Kommentare deaktiviert

The three Toyomiya tombs on Miyako Island

20the Toyomiya tombs (Toyomiya-baka) are three structures located at a gravesite in the north-west of Miyako Island facing Hirara Bay. They are the tombs of the Chūdō-clan, which was established by Nakasone Toyomiya. Designated as important cultural properties of Japan, the three tombs are:

  1. The Tomb of Nakasone Toyomiya
  2. The tomb of Chirimara Toyomiya
  3. The tomb of Atonma
  • Location: Okinawa-ken Hirara-shi Nishi-Nakasone 3-4

Nakasone was a chief (shūchō) on Miyako Island during end of the 15th to the early 16th centuries. Chirimara was his third son. At the Atonma tomb only the second wifes of the Chūdō-clan are enshrined.

  • In local dialect, Toyomiya is pronounced Tūimyā or Tuyumya.

 1. The Tomb of Nakasone Toyomiya

Nakasone Toyomiya was the chief (shūchō) of Miyako during the late 15th to the early 16th century. He was the originator of the Chūdō-clan.

The Jiganemaru, one of thee thre treasured swords of the royal family of Ryukyu.

The Jiganemaru, one of the three treasured swords of the royal family of Ryukyu.

Nakasone helped King Shō Shin crush the uprising of Oyake “devil-tiger” Akahachi in Yaeyama in 1500. Shortly afterwards, three-thousand troops from Shuri invaded Miyako. Nakasone surrendered to save the lives of the inhabitants and was made island chief. Nakasone presented the famous sword Jiganemaru to King Shō Shin (see Karate 1.0: pp. 17, 36, 362, 363)

Summary

  • Name of structure: Nakasone Toyomiya no Haka
  • Number of structures: 1
  • AD: 1751-1829
  • Construction and form etc.: Tomb chamber, a cave fountain (urigā), surrounded by stone walls
  • Specification number: 02285
  • National asset classification: Important Cultural Property
  • Date of classification as a national asset: 1993/04/20

Photo

Nakasone Toyomiya's tomb. Photo courtesy of Paul Vermehren.

Nakasone Toyomiya’s tomb. Photo courtesy of Paul Vermehren.

2. The tomb of Chirimara Toyomiya

This honors Chirimara Toyomiya, the third son of Nakasone Toyomiya. He was of the Miyagane-clan. The tomb is said to have been built around 1750 by Miyagane Kanfū, who served as the village head (kashira) of Hirara.

Summary

  • Name of structure: Chirimara Toyomiya no Haka
  • Number of structures: 1
  • AD: 1751-1829
  • Construction and form etc.: Tomb chamber, tsunpun, surrounded by stone walls
  • Specification number: 02285
  • National asset classification: Important Cultural Property
  • Date of classification as a national asset: 1993/04/20

Photo

Chirimara Toyomiya's tomb. Photo courtesy of Paul Vermehren.

Chirimara Toyomiya’s tomb. Photo courtesy of Paul Vermehren.

3. The tomb of Atonma

At the Atonma tomb only the second wifes of the Chūdō-clan had been enshrined: Atonma is dialect for the term Keishitsu 継室, i.e. second wife. Constructed around the late 18th century to the first half of the 19 century. It is an enclosed tomb made by carvings of the wall of rock and hewn stone.

Summary

  • Name of structure: Atonma Haka
  • Number of structures: 1
  • AD: 1830-1867
  • Construction and form etc.: Tomb chamber; surrounded by stone walls; wooden tags attached to elevated places on the inside of buildings, such as ridgepoles, beams (munafuda); Indian ink drawings (bakusho).
  • Specification number: 02285
  • National asset classification: Important Cultural Property
  • Date of classification as a national asset: 1993/04/20

Photo

Atonma haka. Photo courtesy of Paul Vermehren.

Atonma haka. Photo courtesy of Paul Vermehren.

The characteristics of the structures

The tombs of Nakasone and Chirimara are huge stone-built tombs built during the middle of the eighteenth century and highly valued as representing the unique stone-building architecture of Miyako Island.

View video of the Nakasone Toyomiya tomb

The Atonma Haka is an early nineteenth century construction of masonry techniques utilizing the bedrock.

These tombs have very specific characteristics. At the front entrance of the tomb is a tsunpun: A stone masonry wall provided between the entrance gate and the house blocking the view from the outside. It is also considered to deflect the “southerly winds” and thus prevent evil spirits from entering. The masonry walls were accompanied by wooden boards and hedges.

Watch video of Chirimara Toyomiya tomb

On the outside-top of the tomb chamber are lined seven short stone pillars. Each pillar has a cavity at the top. On occasion of religious rituals wooden girders and beams were placed in those cavities to create a covered area in front of the tomb.

Watch video of the Atonma tomb

These unique structures are found nowhere else in Okinawa.

Photo credit

The photos posted here are courtesy of Paul Vermehren from Scotland. Paul resides in Okinawa and is busy as a high school teacher, singer/songwriter, island camper and expert field-researcher of Ryūkyūan history, and last but not least, internationally recognized master-level beer sommelier.

Veröffentlicht unter Misc, Unknown Ryukyu | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , , | Kommentare deaktiviert

Über den Gusan

19spricht man vom Okinawa Kobudō, fällt hier und da der Begriff des Gūsan. Der Gūsan ist eine ganz bestimmte Stockwaffe. Es ist nicht viel darüber bekannt und man kann es vielleicht eine Nischen-Methode nennen. Im westlichen Verständnis handelt es sich dabei um einen mittellangen Stock, der in Okinawa auf spezifische Weise als Selbstverteidigungsmethode überliefert worden ist. Da nichts Genaues bekannt ist, wird üblicherweise davon ausgegangen, dass es sich dabei um so etwas wie den japanischen Hanbō oder handelt, und dies ist nicht ganz verkehrt.

Über die Verschriftung ausländischer Begriffe

Technische Begriffe, für die es keine einheimischen Namen gibt, werden in Japan mit dem Lautsystem des Katakana verschriftet. Man sieht dies überall, wo Namen und vor allem technische Begriffe oder Bezeichnungen verwendet werden. Ein Beispiel ist der japanische Begriff für Brot, pan パン, welches sich aus dem Spanischen ableitet.

Leuchtreklame mit Katakana.

Leuchtreklame mit Katakana.

In Okinawa werden Begriffe ausländischer Herkunft ebenfalls mittels Katakana gegeben. Im Bereich der Kulturgeschichte ist es wichtig zu verstehen, dass im Verlauf der Geschichte zahlreiche ausländische Begriffe in die okinawanische Sprache übernommen wurden, wobei sich deren Aussprache veränderte. Sie wurden dann zu okinawanischen Wörtern, schriftlich wiedergegeben in Katakana.

Handelte es sich dabei um Wörter chinesischen Ursprungs, wurden dabei jedoch zum Teil die ursprünglichen Schriftzeichen vergessen, und damit ging auch die Referenzierung zu deren ursprünglicher Bedeutung verloren.

Die Rekonstruktion der ursprünglichen Schriftzeichen

In manchen Fällen gelingen verhältnismäßig einleuchtende Rekonstruktionen. In anderen bleibt die Frage nach dem korrekten Bedeutungsinhalt offen.

Als Beispiel kann man die Karate-Kata „Shisōchin“ anführen: Obwohl es dazu verschiedene Schreibweisen in sino-japanischen Kanji gibt, die nicht nur die phonetische Aussprache „Shisōchin“ wiedergeben, sondern auch deren Bedeutung definieren, ist es bis heute nicht klar, ob diese tatsächlich den ursprünglichen Bedeutungsinhalt widerspiegeln. Zu den verschiedenen existenten Schreibweisen von „Shisōchin“ sagte mir Hokama Tetsuhiro, 10. Dan Karate Kobudō und Kurator des ersten Karate-Museums auf Okinawa, dass alle existierenden Versuche, die phonetischen Aussprache von „Shisōchin“ mittels sino-japanischer Kanji schriftlich zu rekonstruieren, verkehrt seien. Fakt ist, dass bereits die erste schriftliche Erwähnung von „Shisōchin“ im Jahre 1867 in Katakana getätigt wurde.

Oder ein bekannteres Beispiel: Jeder hat schon von den Kata namens Heian gehört. Dies wird als Friede, Stille oder Eintracht interpretiert, oder aber as Referenz an den kaiserlicher Hof der Heian-Zeit (794–1185). Als Funakoshi jedoch seine ersten Bücher veröffentlichte, wurde der Name als Pinan gegeben. Dabei wurde die für ausländische Begriffe verwendete Schreibart Katakana benutzt. Auf Okinawa hießen diese Kata immer Pinan. Die Herkunft dessen ist wiederum der chinesische Ausdruck Ping’an 平安, d.h.:  wohlbehalten, gesund und munter, ohne Unfall, ohne Zwischenfälle.

Ähnlich verhält es sich mit dem okinawanischen Begriff Gūsan.

Gūsan als okinawanisches Kompositum

Gūsan ist ein Begriff aus der okinawanischen Sprache. Man kann also versuchen, diesen Begriff erst einmal anhand eben dieser okinawanischen Sprache zu interpretieren. Als Kompositum lässt sich das Wort Gūsan demnach wie folgt interpretieren.

Aus der Vielzahl der homonymen Begriffe ergeben sich zahlreiche Kombinationsmöglichkeiten.

Aus der Vielzahl der homonymen Begriffe ergeben sich zahlreiche Kombinationsmöglichkeiten.

Die Silbe  kann man beispielsweise als „Freunde“ oder „Verbündete“ übersetzen. Für die Silbe San gibt es mindestens sechs verschiedene Interpretations-möglichkeiten. Man kann es in der Bedeutung „eine Opfergabe für die Götter zurückzulassen“ interpretieren. Die Silbe San kann aber gleichzeitig auch einen Stock bezeichnen, wenn auch einen, der speziell zum Verschließen einer Tür gedacht ist.

Aus den verschiedenen Kombinationsmöglichkeiten kann man sich dann eine Bedeutung zurechtdenken.

Gūsan im lexikalischen Sinne als Einzelwort

Anders als oben versucht, kann Gūsan auch als Einzelwort in seiner lexikalischen Bedeutung interpretiert werden. In diesem Fall bedeutet es einfach Stock oder Stütze, unter vergleichender Angabe des japanischen Wortes tsue 杖.

Weitere lexikalische Bedeutungen lassen auf eine kulturelle Verwendung hauptsächlich in Verbindung mit dem religiösem Glauben Okinawas schließen. Ein Beispiel ist der Dashichā-gūsan. Dies ist ein aus dem Holz der Dashichā (lat. Rubiaceae Randia canthioides) gefertigter Stock: Bei der Verkündung von Orakeln halten die heiligen Frauen Okinawas solche Dashichā-gūsan in der Hand. Er wird auch als „Exorzismusstock“ bezeichnet.

Zwei Gusan-uji in okinawanischem Hausaltar.

Zwei Gusan-uji in okinawanischem Hausaltar.

Ein weiteres Beispiel ist der Gūsan-ūji. Dabei handelt es sich um Stöcke aus Zuckerrohr, die als Opfergabe dienen. Beim Obon-Fest nach dem alten Kalender werden diese Stöcke an beiden Seiten des buddhistischen Hausaltars als Opfergabe aufgestellt. Dies hat etwas mit dem Glauben an die Rückkehr der Geister verstorbener Ahnen zu tun, deren Errettung und schließlich deren Rückkehr in die Schattenwelt.

Gūsan in kämpferischen Sinne

Shikomi-tsue

Shikomi-tsue

Mir ist keine lexikalische Definition des Begriffes Gūsan als Fechtstock bekannt. Im Falle einer Umfunktionierung zur Selbstverteidigung kann man den Gūsan jedoch als Fechtstock interpretieren. In diesem Falle würde dem Gūsan eine spezifische Bedeutung zugeschrieben. Angelehnt an oben gegebene lexikalische Bedeutung wäre der Gūsan dann vergleichbar mit dem japanischen Jōjutsu, dem Shikomi-tsue und anderen kurzen bis mittellangen Fechtstöcken unterschiedlicher Ausprägungen. D.h. der Gūsan mag aus alltäglichen Gegenständen zu Gerätewaffen umfunktioniert worden sein. Und so findet er sich auch in einigen okinawanischen Schulen als verwendete Waffe, z.B. im Ryū’ei-ryū von Nakaima, dem Shōrin-ryū Shūbukan von Uema, oder dem Motobu Udundī.

Auch Nakamoto (2007) zählte den Gūsan zu den kampfmässigen Stockmethoden:

In den ländlichen Dörfern werden bei Festivitäten wie dem Eisā- oder dem Bon-Tanz zur Kurzweil Stocktänze aufgeführt, die Bō-odori genannt werden. In farbenfreudigem Ambiente werden dabei Techniken und Bewegungen recht übertrieben dargeboten, wobei der Bō oft weit vom Körper weg geführt wird. Vom Standpunkt der Kampfkunst aus betrachtet mus man deshalb sagen, dass dieser Stocktanz voller Blößen ist. In kämpferischen Bōjutsu hingegen, wie den Mēkata-Bō und anderer kampfmässigen Stockmethoden spricht man hingegen vom […] Gūsan, […] und dergleichen.

Gūsan in der Herleitung aus dem Chinesischen

Etymologische Rekonstruktionen des Begriffs Gūsan ergaben, dass er durch sprachliche Übernahme und Veränderung des chinesischen Begriffs Guaizhang entstand. Guaizhang bedeutet wörtlich Krücke oder Spazierstock und bezeichnet speziell einen Gehstock für ältere Leute. Mit diesem Gehstock ausgeübte Kampftechniken bzw. ein System derselben, werden als Guaizhang-shu bezeichnet. In den nördlichen und südlichen Stile Chinas gibt es nur noch wenige Vertreter dieser Art.

Als Material für diese Waffe dient ein bestimmtes Holz, nämlich das eines alten Glyzinienbaums (Japanischer Blauregen, lat. Wisteria floribunda). Daneben finden auch Rattan und Zuckerrohr Verwendung.

Bartitsu als Beispiel für eine Fechtmethode mit einem Spazierstock.

Bartitsu als Beispiel für eine Fechtmethode mit einem Spazierstock.

Nakaima Kenri vom Ryūei-ryū erlernte das Damo-guai – der Stock des Bodhidharma – in der Gegend von Fujian, bevor er in seine Heimat zurückkehrte. Entsprechend dieser Sichtweise, wurden Guaizhang beziehungsweise dessen Kurzform Guai in Okinawa zu Gūsan korrumpiert, und zwar in der speziellen Bedeutung als Fechtstock. Solche Fechtmethoden mit Spazierstöcken gibt es im Übrigen weltweit und diese sind historisch. Schon bei den alten Ägyptern wurden ähnliche Stocklängen verwendet und in nicht allzuferner Vergangenheit findet sich das Bartitsu als Beispiel für eine Fechtmethode mit einem Spazierstock. Es gibt zahlreiche weitere.

  • Nebenbei bemerkt: Obwohl auch der chinesische Begriff Guaizhang ein Kompositum ist, kommt man hier zu einem völlig anderen Ergebnis als in obigem Abschnitt Gūsan als okinawanisches Kompositum. Dies ist die Crux mit der Rekonstruktion.

Resümee

Im Jigen-ryū werden geeignete Äste von bestimmten Baumsorten abgesägt und zugeschnitten.

Im Jigen-ryū werden geeignete Äste von bestimmten Baumsorten abgesägt und zugeschnitten.

Wann der Begriff Gūsan aber nun erstmals in Okinawa auftauchte, bleibt ebenso unklar wie dessen ursprünglicher Bedeutungsinhalt. Ob nun als beliebiger Begriff für verschiedene Stöcke des alltäglichen Lebens, ob als religiöse Opfergaben, als Exorzismusstöcke der Priesterinnen, oder als Fechtstock; Ob als indigenes Wort oder als Ableitung aus dem chinesischen Guaizhang: Diese Frage lässt sich bislang nicht beantworten.

Im kämpferischen Sinne jedoch bezeichnet der Gūsan nichts anderes als einen zum Fechten verwendeten Stock etwa von der Länge eines Spazierstockes. Dementsprechend lassen sich unendlich viele Anwendungen aus dem Jōjutsu, dem Hanbōjutsu und anderen herleiten.

Uema Jōki (1920-2011), der verstorbene Gründer des Shorin-ryū Shubukan Uema Dōjō auf Okinawa, mit einer Kata unter Verwendung des Gūsan. Die hier verwendeten Gūsan sind natürlich gewachsene Stöcke.

Uema Jōki (1920-2011), der verstorbene Gründer des Shorin-ryū Shubukan Uema Dōjō auf Okinawa, mit einer Kata unter Verwendung des Gūsan. Die hier verwendeten Gūsan sind natürlich gewachsene Stöcke.

Vermutlich wurden die Stöcke für den Gūsan aus der Natur gewählt und ohne aufwendige Fertigungs-methoden hergestellt. Als Uema Jōki (1920-2011), der verstorbene Gründer des Shōrin-ryū Shubukan Uema Dōjō auf Okinawa, eine Kata unter Verwendung des Gūsan vorführte, handelte es such dabei um natürlich gewachsene und minimal nachbearbeitete Stöcke.

Das Shōrin-ryū Shubukan Uema Dōjō wird heute von Jōkis Sohn Uema Yasuhiro geleitet, der auch an der oben erwähnten Vorführung teilnahm.

Ähnlich dem Jigen-ryū kann man dazu Zweige von geeignetem Holz verwenden. Für den Gūsan bite sich wie bereits erwähnt traditionell vor allem der Glyzinienbaum an, sowie Rattan oder auch Zuckerrohr. Haselnussbaum und viele andere Hölzer sind genauso geeignet.

Schaut man sich das Enbusen und die verwendete Techniken der von Uema vorgeführten Kata an, kann man erkennen, dass es sich grundsätzlich um dieselben Techniken wie beim Bōjutsu handelt; Auch wird er trotz seiner Kürze mit beiden Händen geführt ohne das ein Wechsel zu einhändiger Handhabung stattfindet. Neben den Techniken selber ist dies die auffälligeste Parallele zum Bōjutsu.

Dies soll keinesfalls heissen, dass dies immer und ausschließlich so war. Ganz im Gegenteil. Ich tendiere zu der Vermutung, dass Kata mit dem Gūsan eine modernere Kreation sind, die aufbauend auf älteren Tradtitionen geschaffen wurde.

Quellen

  • Kinjō Akio: Karate Denshin-roku – Gekan. Genryū-gata to Denrai no Nazo o Toku. Kaitei Zōho Ban, DVD Eizō Furoku. Tōkyō, Champ 2008.
  • Nakamoto Masahiro: Okinawa Dentō Kobudō. Gairyaku to Shurite-kei Karate Kobujutsu Tetsujin no Keifu. Yuishuppan 2007.
  • Video: Gūsan Kata. Uema Jōki und Mitglieder des Shōrin-ryū Shūbukan Uema Dōjō auf Okinawa.
  • Wörterbuch der Dialekte von Shuri und Naha (Terminologie-Datenbank).
Veröffentlicht unter Books, Unknown Ryukyu | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , , , , , , | Kommentare deaktiviert

Re-evaluation on “A Devil’s hand, a Buddha’s heart”

15once when asked for a brief definition of a good Karate person, Nagamine Shōshin (1907-1997) quoted: Kisshu busshin 鬼手佛心: A demon’s hand, a saint’s heart.

Note: Kisshu busshin is the Sino-Japanese reading of the Kanji. In native Japanese reading it is spelled „Oni te, hotoke kokoro“.

Nagamine was a very erudite person. Since he quoted this saying, it became a venerated dictum among Karate practitioners. Not only are there dōjō in Okinawa that use it as a motto, but it is also frequently quoted in overseas dōjō.

Master Peng says: "Ripping out hearts is my hobby. And it's good for you!"

Master Peng says: “Ripping out hearts is my hobby. It’s good for you!”

Although a specialist area, in Karate rarely a compulsory defined terminology – or nomenclature – is found. For this reason and except the very technical terms, many sayings and concepts in Karate are simply at the hands of everyone‘s free interpretation. This being so, everyone will have a personal interpretation of this saying, differing more or less from others.

In case of such callygraphy-shortcut-style sayings like Kisshu busshin, the biggest problem is that it doesn’t follow proper grammar. We just don’t know: Does it refer to “a person who has a demon’s hand and a saint’s heart”? Or does it refer to “do something with a demon’s hand, but in a saint’s heart”?

Or whatever else you may come up with.

Whether intentionally or not: the very writing style of Kisshu busshin forces you to start a zen-like contemplation on the possible intended meaning. That’s why it is so easy and tempting to attribute various meanings to it.

Surgical intervention necessitates seeming brutal means.

Surgical intervention necessitates seeming brutal means.

But Kisshu busshin originally was not karate jargon. Rather, it has been borrowed from an already existing, yet rarely used jargon. So we find definitions for Kisshu busshin in various dictionaries.[1] According to these dictionaries, the lexical meaning of Kisshu busshin is defined as an expression used by doctors, in particular by surgeons: During surgery, surgeons cut open the body of a patient. But even though the surgeon performs seemingly cruel things with his hands, he does so in a compassionate heart and to save the patient.

In other words, from its outward appearence the surgeon‘s act appears like brutal means being taken: the devil’s hand. On the very inside, however, the surgeon is filled with benevolence for the patient, trying to save him; that is, the Buddha’s mind. According to this, and from the perspective of medical jargon, Kisshu busshin can be interpreted like this:

“The means as severe as that of the devil, but the heart as warm as that of the Buddha.”

Kisshu busshin – as such – is originally a figurative saying in the meaning of:

“Killing evil by doing evil, but for a good intention.”

It’s like the cure for a malady that necessitates some unusually harsh or brutal means:

  • vaccination,
  • pulling a sick tooth
  • cutting open a patient to remove diseased tissue,
  • screwing together a fractured bone,
  • the use of chemotherapy …

The demon’s hand is necessary to bring relief or to save the patient from the situation getting worse.

Karate may be defined as a martial art for self-defense. Considering it from this perspective, Kisshu busshin might be interpreted something like this:

Saving the world by ripping other people's hearts out?

Saving the world by ripping other people’s hearts out?

“Always be compassionate and peaceful like a Buddha. But when forced to defend yourself, destroy as unmerciful as a devil.”

or

“Practicing deadly techniques while maintaining the spirit of humanity.”

Karate may also be defined as a martial art for training the body. Considering it from this perspective, Kisshu busshin might be interpreted something like this:

“Practicing as hard as a devil but having compassion for those who can‘t.”

Karate may also be defined as a martial art for self-improvement. In Nagamine’s “Ethics of the dōjō” we find the very first requirement to be: “First OF ALL purify your mind”. Considering it from this perspective, Kisshu busshin might be interpreted something like this:

“Train like the devil to reach the spirtit of the Buddha.”

The author A. Quast practicing inside Nagamine dojo in Naha Kumoji, February 2008.

The author A. Quast practicing inside Nagamine dojo in Naha Kumoji, February 2008.

Unifying the above train of thought, I personally tend to interpret Nagamine’s intention for describing a “good Karate person” by the expression Kisshu busshin as thus:

“By using the austere practice of Karate as a tool, you act as your own surgeon, self-removing YOUR OWN moral diseases. In this way, by removing the evil within, you finally serve the spirit of humanity.”

In the end the interpretation remains a question of preference. It depends on what you consider a desease. And it depends of whether you consider yourself as venerable as the example of Buddha. It is much too easy to consider oneself “good” and others “bad”. So it is in your own responsibility how you interpret Kisshu busshin. Otherwise you might become the devil instead of the Buddha… So first of all purify YOUR mind.

A happy buddha.

A happy buddha.

[1] For example, the Jitsuyō Nihongo Hyōgen Jiten 実用日本語表現辞典, the Daijirin 大辞林 (a Japanese monolingual dictionary published by Sanseidō), and the Sekai Shūkyō Yōgo Daijiten 世界宗教用語大事典.

Veröffentlicht unter Misc, Unknown Ryukyu | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , | Kommentare deaktiviert

Die Herkunft des Saijutsu von Hama Higa

Anmerkung: Dies ist meine Übersetzung eines um 1970 von Taira Shinken verfassten Artikels, der in der erweiterten und verbesserten Ausgabe des Ryūkyū Kobudō Taikan (1997, S. 183-84, Hrsg. Inoue Kishō) posthum abgedruckt wurde. Obwohl die erwähnten Personen und Vorkommnisse alle historisch belegbar sind, fehlt bisher ein Nachweise für die Aufführung des Saijutsu.

The professional Go player Honinbo Dosaku (1645–1702), bearer of the 9th dan.

The professional Go player Honinbo Dosaku (1645–1702), bearer of the 9th dan.

08heute vor über 300 Jahren, am 17. Tag des 4. Monats Tenna 2 (1682), spielte der gelehrte Go-Spieler Hama Higa Pēchin eine Partie gegen den 4. Hon’inbō Dōsaku (1645-1702). Dōsaku trug den Ehrentitel Godokoro, der ihm vom Kommissar für Tempel und Schreine verliehen wurde, und damit war er die höchste Autorität auf diesem Gebiet. Auch war er der erste, der den Titel Gosei trug, d.h. der „Heilige des Go-Spiels“.

Vor der Zeit Dōsakus war der Spielstil im Go sozusagen „Streitprinzip.“ Erst Dōsaku erfand das Prinzip des Fuseki 布石, der strategischen Anordnung der Go-Steine. Dieses Prinzip verbreitet sich sehr schnell und in Ehrung seines Namens fast auf einen Schlag als Dōsaku-ryū bekannt. Im Gegensatz dazu bezeichnete man die althergebrachte, grobe Spielart des Go als Sanchi-ryū.

Ein Hauptgesandter während einer Edo-nobori (Bildrolle, ORJ).

Ein Hauptgesandter während einer Edo-nobori (Bildrolle, ORJ).

Als König Shō Tei von Ryūkyū von Dōsakus hervorragenden Fähigkeiten erfuhr, war sein Interesse geweckt. Bisher glaubte der König fest, dass China als Herkunftsland des Go die stärksten Spieler hätte. Im Jahr Tenna 2 (1682) dann schickte König Shō Tei eine Gesandtschaft nach Edo, um dem neuen Shōgun Tsunayoshi zu dessen Amtsnachfolge zu gratulieren. Solche Reisen wurden Edo-nobori genannt – nach Edo gehen – und von einem Glückwunschboten geleitet. Der Glückwunschbote dieser Reise war Nago Ōji Chōgen (Prinz Chōgen von Nago). König Shō Tei entschied sich, bei dieser Gelegenheit den jungen Hama Higa Pēchin mitnehmen zu lassen, der als bester Go-spieler von Ryūkyū galt.

Damals gab es eine strenge Vorschrift, wonach offizielle Go-Partien gegen den größten Meister von der Shōgunat-Regierung genehmigt werden mussten. Daher schickte Shō Tei eine Anfrage an das Shimazu-Lehen zwecks Vermittlung eines Spiels zwischen Dōsaku und Hama Higa Pēchin. Erst durch die Vermittlung von Mitsuhisa Shimazu, Feudalherr des Shimazu-Lehens, konnte das Spiel zwischen Dōsaku und Hama Higa Pēchin verwirklicht werden.

Junger Pechin während einer Edo-nobori (Bildrolle, ORJ).

Junger Pechin während einer Edo-nobori (Bildrolle, ORJ).

Während seiner Reise nach Edo führte Hama Higa Pēchin vor Shōgun Tokugawa Tsunayoshi als Darbietung eine besondere Spezialität aus Ryūkyū vor: Saijutsu-Kata. König Shō Tei ehrte diese Vorführung im Nachhinein mit dem Namen Sanchi-ryū – das heißt mit dem Namen der althergebrachten Spielart des Go nach dem „Streitprinzip“. Später wurde dieses unter dem Namen Hama Higa no Sai weitergegeben.

Veröffentlicht unter Misc, Unknown Ryukyu | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , , , | Kommentare deaktiviert

Snapshot: A polymorphic grappling action from a 1556 treatise

21understanding how things work is essential in MA. We watch videos today, which is the learning aid of our time. In engineering, we call this utility film. In the future, we might also be able to use augmented reality. Historically, however, we used the method of “picture + descriptive text” to describe instructions for lines of action – like in grappling, fencing, etc. This worked well for centuries. And it still does.

The picture in such a description most often shows only one snapshot within a polymorphic action. So, by looking at the picture, you might get an idea what to do, but without the descriptive text you will never be able to understand – and to know for sure – what the intended action was meant to be: Where does it start, where does it end, and what exactly is done in between?

Furthermore you would need to not only understand the language the text is written in, but also be experienced in the practical application of the specific field in question. In this case, I’d like to take a look at a short polymorphic action – or a combo or drill if you like – I translated both in language as well as in practical implementation from the German fencing Codex I.6.4º.2, from the year AD 1556.

A polymorphic action as depicted and described in the Wallerstein Codex. (Picture credit: “Wiktenauer” Facebook page)

A polymorphic action as depicted and described in the Wallerstein Codex. (Picture credit: “Wiktenauer” Facebook page)

When you visualize the technique, you would most probably come up with something like morote-gari as found in Kodokan Judo:

From the picture it would seem it is a technique like morote-gari as found in Kodokan Judo.

Morote-gari as found in Kodokan Judo.

Now add the following written description from the 1556 original, take a partner and re-enact it.

First, the instruction says that both parties are already engaged. Then it tells the left person to seize the head of his opponent (right):

1) When you grapple closely, try to grab his head with your arms.

Next, if the right person escapes this attempt, the left person achieved to create a ‘favorable tactical situation’, which he then applies like this:

2) If he wards this off and stretches himself up and backwards to prevent being grapped at the head, then quickly bend down and ram your head against his chest or his abdomen, and thereby lay hold of both his legs with both your hands – as is shown in the drawing – and simultaneously ram your head in and pull his legs back with your arms: in this way he falls on his back.

Finally, the instruction tells the left person what to do, if he would be the one being attacked that way: In practical application you now place yourself in the position of the right person.

3) When you are being attacked in this way, wait for him to bend forward, and in the moment he tries to ram his head into your chest or stomach, smash your knee under his chin.

From the above description it becomes clear that the “technique” is actually a complex action. Just like we can rebuilt Da Vinci’s machines, with the knowledge of language and practical experience it is possible to decode and re-enact each and any of the fighting pieces we inherited from our ancestors. And there are thousands of it, recorded during the height of this art.

A polymorphic action as depicted and described in the Wallerstein Codex.

A polymorphic action as depicted and described in the Wallerstein Codex. (Picture credit: “Wiktenauer” Facebook page)

 

Veröffentlicht unter Misc | Kommentare deaktiviert

25yuken Teruya: “Parade from far far away” (Detail view). Bingata technique on banana leaf fiber. 2014. From: “On Okinawa: Collections from the Past and the Future.” Dahlem Ethnological Museum/Asian Art Museum. Humboldt Lab Dahlem. September 23, 2014–February 8, 2015.
http://www.humboldt-forum.de/en/home/

Yuken Teruya: "Parade from far far away"

Yuken Teruya: “Parade from far far away”

Publiziert am von Andreas Quast | Kommentare deaktiviert

Excerpts of Ryukyu-related items in the Museum of Ethnology, Berlin

“The Kingdom of Ryukyu was, from its beginnings in the middle ages up to 1879, besides the Yamato State, the Heian Court or the shogunates of Kamakura, Muromachi and Edo, the only other independent political entity on the Japanese Islands.” Josef Kreiner 1996

01atotal of 1483 Ryukyu-related items in 54 different museums have been verified in European collections. The bulk of these – in terms of numbers of museums and of items – is to be found in Germany: 529 items (35.7%) are found in 21 museums. The Netherlands follow, then come Austria, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Norway and France.

Here I’d like to take a look at some of the items from the possession of the Museum of Ethnology in Berlin. With its roots dating back as far as the 17th century, this museum opened in 1886 under the name of “Museum für Völkerkunde”.

Its collection comprises a total of 508,000 ethnografika and archaeological objects. In addition, it houses 285,000 ethnographic photo documents, 200,000 pages of written documents, 140,000 ethnographic music and sound recordings, 20,000 ethnographic films and 50,000 meters of uncut footage. The Museum of Ethnology in Berlin is therefore one of the biggest museums of ethnology worldwide and constitutes the most comprehensive collection of its kind in Europe.

The Museum of Ethnology on a post card, around 1900

The Museum of Ethnology on a post card, around 1900

During the era of National Socialism, the Museum of Ethnology in its presentation did not ingratiate to the dominant ideology and was maintained almost unchanged.

Following the end of the war in 1945, the collections were confiscated by the Allies. The Western Allies returned the collection back to Berlin in the 1950s, while the Soviet Trophy Commission took their part to Leningrad as spoils of war.

After the reunification the collection divided to East and West Berlin were merged together again. From among the original 1 million+ items, the whereabouts of 25,000 objects remained unclear.

Since 2000, the relocation of the Ethnological Museum to the Humboldt Forum is planned.

As had been published by the Motobu-ryu, in 1884 alone the Museum of Ethnology in Berlin purchased 543 objects from Okinawa via the Japanese government. Among these were a yari (槍, spear) and a yamanata (山鉈, hatchet; yamanaji in Okinawan language), weapons and tools which are still used in Kobudo.

A list of items was provided in Kreiner 1996. According to it, among the more than 500 items found within German collections are:

  • hairpins (kanzashi, jiifaa)
  • hunting spear
  • a saddle with red, green and yellow lacquer on wood and design of peonies
  • hanging scrolls
  • fishing gear
  • caps of officials (hachimaki)
  • musical instruments (Sanshin, handdrums)
  • sets of clothes from various social strata
  • lacquer ware
  • etc.

The following are Ryūkyū-related items from the digital collection of the Ethnological Museum in Berlin.

Hachimaki, © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Hachimaki, © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Item: Officials headgear of originally red ground, interwoven with five colors of threads, from the royal court of Shuri

  • Era: beginning of Meiji period, before 1883
  • Place of origin: Ryūkyū/Okinawa, Naha City Shuri-jō
  • Material: silk, pigment
  • Measure: height: 10.0 cm, circumference: 64.0 cm
  • Ident.Nr. I D 6823

 

Winter court garb. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Winter court garb. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Item: Winter court garb

  • Era: beginning of Meiji period or earlier
  • Place of origin: Ryūkyū/Okinawa, Naha City Shuri-jō
  • Material: Banana fiber, herbal dye
  • Length x width: 155 x 155,5 cm
  • Ident.Nr. I D 6655

 

 

 

 

Hachimaki. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Hachimaki. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Item: Officials cap (hachimaki)

  • Era: beginning of Meiji period
  • Place of origin: Ryūkyū
  • Material: crepe, pigment
  • Measure: Height: 10,0 cm, Circumference: 64,0 cm
  • Ident.Nr. I D 6828

 

 

 

Ladies winter garb. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Ladies winter garb. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Item: Winter garb of a lady at the royal court at Shuri

  • Era: beginning of Meiji period or earlier
  • Place of origin: Ryūkyū/Okinawa, Naha City Shuri-jō
  • Material: Cotton, bingata
  • Length x width: 134 x 125 cm
  • Ident.Nr. I D 6678

 

 

 

 

Lacquer tray. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Lacquer tray. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Item: lacquer ware tray with decoration of dragons among clouds

  • Era: late 18th century
  • Place of origin: Ryūkyū/Okinawa
  • Material: black lacquer and mother of pearl inlay on wood
  • Height x Diameter: 7,8 x 68,3 cm
  • Ident.Nr. 2000-8

 

 

 

Sugar cane press. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Sugar cane press. © National Museums in Berlin, Prussian Cultural Heritage, Museum of Ethnology. Photographer: Claudia Obrocki.

Item: Watercolor, sugar cane press

  • Era: beginning of Meiji period
  • Place of origin: Ryūkyū/Okinawa
  • Material: paper
  • Measure: 44,5 x 80,0 cm
  • Ident.Nr. I D 7016

 

 

Addendum

The Motobu Udundi Facebook administrator just added a link to the Tokyo National Museum, showing a Akaji goshiki ukiori kan, or “headgear of red ground, interwoven with five colors of threads).

Item: Officials headgear of red ground, interwoven with five colors of threads

  • Era: 19th century.
  • Place of origin: Ryūkyū/Okinawa, Naha City Shuri-jō
  • Material: silk, pigment
  • Measure: Length 21.0cm, width 19.0cm, height 13.2cm.
Akaji goshiki ukiori kan, or "headgear of red ground, interwoven with five colors of threads. © Tokyo National Museum.

Akaji goshiki ukiori kan, or “headgear of red ground, interwoven with five colors of threads”. © Tokyo National Museum.

Recommended reading: Josef Kreiner (Ed.): Sources of Ryukyuan History and Culture in European Collections. Phillipp-Franz-von-Siebold-Stiftung, Deutsches Institut für Japanstudien, Monographien 13. Iucidium 1996.

Veröffentlicht unter Unknown Ryukyu | Verschlagwortet mit , | Kommentare deaktiviert

Irgendwas ist anders – Ein Abgesang

13manchmal merkt man es. Sie sind irgendwie anders. Sie tragen dieselben Sachen, machen dieselben Dinge. Sie sind wie du und ich, Anfänger Fortgeschrittene, was auch immer.

Manchmal sind sie sogar Autoritäten auf ihrem Gebiet mit hohen Graduierungen, Titeln, oder Medaillensammlungen, einer eigenen Schule.

Und doch, irgendwas ist anders als bei mir.

Regelmäßig liest man von ihnen, auf Facebook, ihren Blogs, Webseiten, oder sonstwo, wie sie wieder an einem Seminar teilnahmen, organisiert natürlich vom internationalen Hauptquartier und geleitet vom Weltcheftrainer höchstpersönlich.

Und doch – man fühlt es irgendwie – irgendwas ist anders, aber es ist nicht greifbar. Alles machen und können sie, doch irgendwie nichts richtig. Sie wissen viel, sind überall, kennen diesen und jenen, lassen Fotos von sich und anderen machen. Bei Fragen winken sie ab, so als ob sie sagen wollten: „Das spielt alles keine Rolle.“

Unbezahlte Geschichtenerzähler reden über sie, verbreiten ihre „Heldengeschichten“, vielleicht in der Erwartung, eines Tages für diese Dienst belohnt zu werden: „Er trainiert sehr viel, nicht wahr?“ oder „Er tut alles für die Kunst“.

Bilder von Loyalität und Ehre werden heraufbeschworen, die irgendwie mit den zwei-, dreimaligen Trainings die Woche und gelegentlichen Wochenendtreffen in Verbindung stehen sollen. Dabei gibt man sich gediegen, ein bisschen wie das britische Königshaus.

Ist man nicht gerade einer dieser jungen Sportler – Oh, schöner Vogel Jugend! – dann ist Loyalität DAS herausragende Leitmotiv des Karate, sein Maßstab, seine Beurteilungs- und Benotungsgrundlage. Es ist die wichtigste Schnittmenge dessen, was traditionelles Karate genannt wird: Loyalität zum Club, Loyalität zum Meister, Loyalität zum Stil, Loyalität zur Tradition, Loyalität zu einer Sichtweise, Loyalität zur geheimen Botschaft der okinawanischen Bittermelone usw.

Technische Inhalte und Stilfeinheiten in allen Ehren: ohne Loyalität, bedeuten sie gar nichts. Und nur aus der jahrelang gezeigten und dokumentierten Loyalität heraus ergibt sich potentielle Berechtigung, irgendwann einmal in der Zukunft selbst ein echter anerkannter Vertreter dieses Stils, jenes Meisters, oder jener Idee zu werden.

Unverschämt offen zur Schau getragene rufen sie uns auf ihren Facebook-Posts zu:

„Hier schau, der Beweis: ich habe trainiert!“

Ok, läuft bei dir!

Aus Asien, Amerika, und Sankt Augustin regnet es freundliche Einladungen, stilvoll gestaltet und formuliert von Facebook-Account-besitzenden Anführern harmonischer, weltweit aufgestellter Trainings-Gruppen. Man kann sie kaum davon abhalten nicht bereits am Tage ihrer Gründung die erste Weltmeisterschaft abzuhalten.

„Komm doch mal wieder vorbei! Das macht Spass!“, lautet die Botschaft.

Dabei ist regelmäßige körperliche Anwesenheit der Schlüssel zu allem; qualitative Fortschritte hingegen spielen eine untergeordnete Rolle. Anführer auf Club- oder Verbandsebene werden auf Managementebene festgelegt, ausgewählt von oben, aufgrund beliebiger Qualitäten. Der Schwur der Loyalität und der uneingeschränkte Wille zum Vereinsleben ist das wichtigste Argument. Ein guter finanzieller Hintergrund und Erfolg im Job spielen ebenfalls eine wichtige Rolle: Karate kostet immens viel Zeit und Geld. Dann steht hohen Ämtern und Würden nichts mehr im Wege. Dies ist der erprobte Weg, sein eigenes Andenken am Leben zu erhalten und zu bewahren indem man das Andenken an jemand anderen aufrecht erhält. So geht das in der unkritischen Kulturwirtschaftsmaschine.

Dass es kaum jemandem gelingen kann, diesen Kreis zu durchbrechen, ist Fakt. Abweichungen sind nicht vorgesehen, selbstständiges Denken wird nicht honoriert, höchstens geduldet. Eintänzer wollen eintanzen, nichts anderes.

Irgendwas ist anders, doch es ist kaum unterscheidbar. Kultur, Gesundheit, Sport, Gemeinschaft, Selbstverteidigung, Ehre, der Kampf für ein besseres Selbst. Loyalität. Oder Politik? Nein, das ist es auch nicht.

Es ist der Konsum des Karate.

Der Konsum des Karate

Der Konsum des Karate

Veröffentlicht unter Misc | Kommentare deaktiviert

On jūjutsu and yawara, 1898

In 1898 Prof. Dr. Miura read an article in front of the “Deutsche Gesellschaft für Natur- und Völkerkunde Ostasiens” (“German Society for the Natural History and Ethnology of East Asia”).

It was titled:

“On jūjutsu and yawara”

The practice of Jiu-jitsu in Germany has an uninterrupted tradition that goes back as far as 1905. This article is proof that written works and practical assessments were begun already earlier.

The article included insightful eplanations on the history of jūjutsu, the meaning of the word, the eight categories of techniques used, and the four main categories used in yawara: randori, kata, atemi and sappō, and katsu. These were all explained in detail.

At the end, Inoue Keitarō of the Tenjin Shin’yō-ryū Jūjutsu demonstrated the art in front of the audience.

On jūjutsu and yawara, 1898, by Prof. Dr. Miura

On jūjutsu and yawara, 1898, by Prof. Dr. Miura

Veröffentlicht unter Misc | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , , , , | Kommentare deaktiviert