Category Archives: kobudo

NEW RELEASE: Bo – Techniques, Forms, and Partner Practices of Ancient Okinawan Fighting Traditions. Volume 1: Bo-odori.

Softcover Release scheduled for March 1, 2024, 12:00 a.m. on all Amazon regional pages. Softcover edition: US | UK | DE | FR | ES | IT | NL | JP | BR | CA | MX | AU | … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, kobudo, kumibo, Performing Arts, Postwar Okinawa Karate, Prewar Okinawa Karate, Publications, Terminology, The Technique of Okinawa Karate and Kobudo, Theories of Historical Karate in Comparative Perspective, Tsuken | Comments Off on NEW RELEASE: Bo – Techniques, Forms, and Partner Practices of Ancient Okinawan Fighting Traditions. Volume 1: Bo-odori.

Kongō no Kata (formerly known as Shūshi no Kon)

I wrote about Kongō no Kon recently, which was created by Taira Shinken based on elements taken from Sueyoshi no Kon, Sesoko no Kon, and Soeishi no Kon. Then Mr. Y, one of the inquirers, asked about another kata called Kongō he had … Continue reading

Posted in Bojutsu Kata Series, kobudo | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Kongō no Kata (formerly known as Shūshi no Kon)

The creation of sai choreographies – Hints on example of Yāka no Sai

I have previously noted about Yakā no Sai, explaining the meaning of the word yāka and so forth. In the meantime, I stumbled upon the oldest reference I could find so far explaining the meaning of yāka (guardian) as a … Continue reading

Posted in Comparative Analyses, kobudo, Saijutsu, Terminology, The Technique of Okinawa Karate and Kobudo, Theories of Historical Karate in Comparative Perspective | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on The creation of sai choreographies – Hints on example of Yāka no Sai

Is Namihira-bō the original Tsuken-bō?

As part of my ongoing research into village staff fencing (mura-bō), I stumbled upon this this performance, which took place in Hawaii. I posted about it on Facebook in January 2104. Back then, the following information came to light. It is … Continue reading

Posted in kobudo, kumibo, Terminology, The Technique of Okinawa Karate and Kobudo, Tsuken | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Is Namihira-bō the original Tsuken-bō?

Tsuken was neither known for Tsuken-bō nor Jigen-ryū, but for horsemanship

As mentioned before, today Tsuken Uēkata Seisoku is considered the originator of Tsuken Bō and an expert in Jigen-ryū swordmanship. Even an English Wikipedia entry says he “was good at riding horses and Jigen-ryū,” presenting the Kyūyō as the source. The Kyūyō … Continue reading

Posted in Bojutsu Kata Series, kobudo, Kyūyō, Matayoshi Kobudo, Postwar Okinawa Karate, Prewar Okinawa Karate, The Technique of Okinawa Karate and Kobudo, Translations, Tsuken | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Tsuken was neither known for Tsuken-bō nor Jigen-ryū, but for horsemanship

Tsuken Akan’chū and the impossibility of a direct personal instruction by Tsuken Uēkata

In my previous article I shared the story of Tsuken Uēkata. At the end of that story, Tsuken Uēkata was interned in Kagoshima after his political intrigue was discovered. So, how, and when did he create Tsuken-bō, and how was … Continue reading

Posted in Bojutsu Kata Series, kobudo, Matayoshi Kobudo, Postwar Okinawa Karate, Prewar Okinawa Karate, Terminology, The Technique of Okinawa Karate and Kobudo, Theories of Historical Karate in Comparative Perspective, Tsuken | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Tsuken Akan’chū and the impossibility of a direct personal instruction by Tsuken Uēkata

Okinawan “Colonist Samurai”

Okinawan peace theory is a difficult topic, most of all for Okinawans themselves. Often, the era of the 15 Years War and Okinawan participation in “the system” is categorically marginalized, denied, and not addressed. The reasons for this are varied, … Continue reading

Posted in kobudo, Okinawa Peace Theory | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Okinawan “Colonist Samurai”

An incomplete chronology of the nunchaku

The oldest source on the nunchaku so far seems to be by William Henry Furness III (1866–1920), American physician, ethnographer and author, who visited Okinawa from March 13 to 26, 1896, saying, Non-shaku [nunchaku] is played with a stick about … Continue reading

Posted in kobudo | Tagged | Comments Off on An incomplete chronology of the nunchaku

Getting a grip: Positioning of the Tinbē

Before I talked about the disadvantages of the single grip of the Taira tinbe. To give you an impression, I assumed a two-sided lever with the formula F1 · l1 = F2 · l2. As a comparison, the punching forces … Continue reading

Posted in kobudo, Postwar Okinawa Karate | Tagged , | Comments Off on Getting a grip: Positioning of the Tinbē

When was Kanegawa no Tinbē created?

Yesterday, David Hansen of Isshin-ryū posted a good question on Facebook. It is as follows. This photo shows Shinken Sensei to be holding more of a machete than short spear.  What year did this lineage change to short spear and … Continue reading

Posted in kobudo, Terminology | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on When was Kanegawa no Tinbē created?