Category Archives: kobudo

Control the opponent without causing injury. Kyan Shinei (1912-97). Sai. Bringing attention to Okinawa’s platonic ideal of peace.

Sai, which are used as weapons in ancient martial arts (kobudō), has been studied by warriors (bujin) since the Ryukyu Kingdom era. Originally used by the Buddhist monks of the Shaolin Temple in China, it is said that the tip … Continue reading

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Sai, Tinbe and the “Expedition to the Southern Islands” 1893

As previously mentioned, in 2021, a list of “100 Footprints of Modern Karate” was published in the Okinawa Times. I have already written about Footprint No. 1 and Footprint No. 2 and today will turn to Footprint No. 3. Footprint … Continue reading

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Tode, Karate in the Tafaku 1867

Yesterday I wrote about the written notation of tōde 唐手 as found in the play Nizan Waboku (The Reconciliation of Nanzan and Hokuzan) in 1867 and 1891. While it used the same original notation as karate / tōde, it turned … Continue reading

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Karate, Tōde, and “The Reconciliation of Nanzan and Hokuzan”

As mentioned previously, in 2021, a list of “100 Footprints of Modern Karate” were published in the Okinawa Times. Of course, “Modern Karate” here refers to the period since the establishment of Okinawa Prefecture in 1879. In this list, footprint … Continue reading

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Was soll das heißen? – Terminologische und technische Implikationen des Nagahama Bō

Eine Terminologie bezeichnet die „Gesamtheit der in einem Fachgebiet üblichen Fachwörter und -ausdrücke“ oder einfach „Nomenklatur.“ Innerhalb der Entstehung von Karate- und Kobudō-Terminologien gibt es einige Punkte zu beachten. Erst einmal entwickelten sich die modernen Karate- und Kobudō-Terminologien erst im … Continue reading

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Kinjō Ufuchiku, whose name is left behind in Sai

This short article is a translation of: Nakamura A.: Sai de mei nokosu Kinjō Ufuchiku. Tikubushi no keifu, Dai Nanakai. Kindai karate-shi o tadoru. Bugi no denshō keiro ②. Okinawa Times, June 21, 2020. Last time, after confirming the modern … Continue reading

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Shushi no Kon (old-style) 3 – Nejiru

This is about Shushi no Kon (old-style) as I have described here in text and illustration as well as in video here. In his 1930 description, which is the earliest description of a Bō kata, Miki uses the term nejiru on … Continue reading

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Shushi no Kon (old-style) 2 – A Video of the Kata

This is the video of Shushi no Kon (old-style) as I have described here. I have learned this kata from various sources. First of all, I have learned it as “Koryū Shūshi no Kon” from Akamine Hiroshi Sensei of Shimbukan … Continue reading

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Shushi no Kon (old-style) 1 – The 1930 Description by Miki Jisaburō

This post is my 2009 translation of “Shūshi no Kon” as published in 1930 by Miki Jisaburō. Miki had learned it from Ōshiro Chōjo in 1929. I have shortened, simplified and renumbered the description to make it easier to follow … Continue reading

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Yamanni-ryu – Is the founder’s name Sanrā, Sanda, Masanrā, or Saburō?

Chinen Masami (1898–1976) was an Okinawan bōjutsu expert. He taught privately at his home in Shuri Tōbaru, Okinawa. He named his style Yamannī-ryū after his grandfather Chinen Sanrā 知念三良 (1842–1925). There is some confusion about the first name of Chinen Sanrā. For instance, various … Continue reading

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