Author Archives: Andreas Quast

3 – The Theory of Tī

The Lexical Meaning of Tī The lexical meaning of the character for the word Tī, written in Japanese Kanji as 手, comprises of various meanings and uses. First of all, it denotes the human arm as well as the hand … Continue reading

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2 – Perception of the Weapons Ban Under Satsuma

Kerr noted that “no evidence can be found to suggest that the Okinawans at any time contemplated an attempt to throw off Japanese controls.”[1] Indeed, judging from all sources available it is quite obvious that neither the political nor the … Continue reading

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1 – The Weapons Ban Theories

According to a foundational theory of Karate, in pre-modern times an indigenous unarmed martial art of Ryūkyūan design existed. Generally referred to as Tī 手 in the native pronunciation, it is considered a native form of boxing and an original … Continue reading

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Quicky on Shiko

In Karate there is a stance called Shiko-dachi 四股立ち. Shiko-dachi is a modern Japanese term from the sphere of “developing a standardized Karate terminology”, i.e. earliest from about the latter part of the 1st  half of the 20th century, more likely from about … Continue reading

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Okinawa’s original dōjō

Previously I wrote about Okinawa’s earliest forms of community organization called Makyo. The article received only very few likes and seriously I don’t have any clue as to why this is so. Because the most important part of the article … Continue reading

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NEUERSCHEINUNG: Studien zur Kampfkunst in Japan. Band 1.

Bunbu Forschungskreis: Studien zur Kampfkunst in Japan. Band 1. Augsburg/Tōkyō 2017. Im umfangreichen Schrifttum zur Theorie, Philosophie und Ethik der vormodernen Kampfkünste Japans ist der Ausdruck bunbu-ryodo, verstanden im Sinne „einer gemeinsamen kulturellen, moralischen und kämpferischen Schulung“, häufig anzutreffen. In … Continue reading

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Online Exhibition: Order of the Rising Sun

Photo: Certificate and “Two-colored Order of the Rising Sun”, Knight 1st Class (Kyokujitsu sōkōshō 旭日双光章) Awarded: in the name of the Japanese Emperor Recipient: Nagamine Shōshin Date: April 29, 1982. Photo: Andreas Quast Photo Date: May 23, 2009. Location: Kōdōkan Nagamine Dōjō, headquarter … Continue reading

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Kinjō Hiroshi: From karate 唐手 to karate 空手 – Introduction

More than one century has passed since the creation of karate 唐手 in 1905. About seventy-five years ago, in 1936, karate 唐手 was renamed to karate 空手. Since I have had made karate 唐手 my life-task in 1926, about eighty-five years … Continue reading

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The techniques of Chinen Masami’s Yamani-ryū

Chinen Masami 知念正実 (1898–1976) was an Okinawan bōjutsu expert. He taught privately at his home in Shuri Tōbaru, Okinawa. He named his style Yamani-ryū 山根流 after his grandfather Chinen Sanrā 知念三良 (1842–1925). In a newspaper article from 1918 Sanrā was … Continue reading

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‘nchi means tī 手

As I noted earlier and in fact already back in 2005, the honorific term for tī  手 (ティー) in the Okinawan language was ‘nchi ンチ. Now, usually the syllables of Naihanchi have always and unanimously been considered to be Nai|han|chi. But what if it is Nai|ha|‘nchi? … Continue reading

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