Tag Archives: Ti

‘nchi means tī 手

As I noted earlier and in fact already back in 2005, the honorific term for tī  手 (ティー) in the Okinawan language was ‘nchi ンチ. Now, usually the syllables of Naihanchi have always and unanimously been considered to be Nai|han|chi. But what if it is Nai|ha|‘nchi? … Continue reading

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On Tīshimi and Tī

During his period of government service, Tei Junsoku 程順則 (1663–1734) traveled to Qing China four times, and one time to the Japanese capital of Edo. Later he was promoted to Sanshikan of the royal government in Shuri and awarded the … Continue reading

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Snippet on Ti 手(ティー)

tumbling over an old e-budo post of mine, I found the hint that in the Okinawan language the honorific term for hand was nchi ンチ. I ponder if this is related to Naifa’nchi? For instance, assuming Naifanchi was written 内法手, then in Mandarin … Continue reading

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Mekata and Ti = Okinawan Pogo or Dancefloor Wingchun?

he elementary school teacher, Karate man and author Funakoshi Gichin in 1914 noted on rural dances called Mēkata 舞方: He considered these to be not-yet-developed precursors of Karate. Currently these Mēkata are again variously perceived as archetypes of an indigenous … Continue reading

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