Category Archives: Unknown Ryukyu

Kyan Chōtoku book on public display at the Karate Kaikan for the first time

A panel exhibition sponsored by Okinawa Prefecture that introduces the history of Okinawa karate during the early Shōwa period (started 1926) began on April 8 in the lobby of the Okinawa Karate Kaikan Exhibition Room in Tomigusuku City. The kumite … Continue reading

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Traditional Ryūkyū kumi-odori, karate … 165 prewar Okinawan photographs discovered (3)

Traditional “Kumi-odori” of the kingdom era presented to the younger brother of Shōwa Emperor (Hirohito) Among the Okinawa-related photographs found this time in the Asahi Shimbun Osaka Headquarters, there was a photograph of the traditional Kabuki drama “Kumi-odori” of the … Continue reading

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Inutabu Riot (Inutabu Sōdō 犬田布騒動)

The Inutabu Riot occurred on April 23, 1864 (old lunar calendar: March 18, Bunkyū 4) in Inutabu Village, Tokunoshima. From the peasant’s point of view it is also called Inutabu Crusade (Inutabu gisen 犬田布義戦), emphasizing the righfulness of the action. … Continue reading

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The Twilight of Lord Kogusuku

Traditional Okinawa kobudō uses a shield with one hand in combination with a weapon in the other. There are basically two variants. One is the shield known best from Matayoshi lineage kobudō, which uses loop and handle, and which is … Continue reading

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Chiishi and Ishi-sashi — Traditional athletic culture (undo bunka) of Okinawa

At the beginning of the 20th century, while young men’s associations in all places worked to promote sports, the Young Men’s Associations of Shimajiri County carried out a survey about recreational pastimes: “Right now, this county’s citizens compete in only … Continue reading

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Where dragons look

A photo of Shuri Castle main hall (seiden) taken in 1877 was confirmed. It is the oldest photo of Shuri Castle. The photo was taken by Jules Joseph Gabriel Revertégat (1850-1912), a French lieutenant of the Navy who was on … Continue reading

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Zen Nihon Karate-dō Renmei – High summer inquiry, 1956

Zen Nihon Karate-dō Renmei – High summer inquiry President Sai Chōkō Vice president Konishi Yasuhiro Vice president Kinjō Hiroshi Board chairman Nakamura Norio (member of the Kanbukan) Izumikawa Kanki – consultant (Senbukan Gōjū-ryū, Ryūkyū Kobudō) Teshirogi Tadashi – consultant Ishiguro … Continue reading

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Spiking the jujube date

One of the very few technical terms of old-style karate still currently handed down in Okinawa is kōsā. The original designation koza changed over time and was mostly forgotten or simply replaced by modern Japanese terminology, namely by the terms … Continue reading

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Sanchin

It seems that Higashionna Kanryō trained Sanchin as a technique to acquire skill. Miyagi on the other hand thought there was already enough practice of kaishu-gata, but heishu-gata were lacking. He began to aim at physical education and martial arts … Continue reading

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What’s in a hairpin?

Various experts repeatedly likened karate to Ryūkyūan dance. For example, Funakoshi Gichin wrote that “As a martial art unique to Okinawa, the Mēkata dances of the rural areas are the same as not yet developed karate.” (1) More than a … Continue reading

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