Category Archives: Kyūyō

The Kyūyō 球陽 is an important historical work about Ryūkyū, compiled by Tei Heitetsu, Sai Kōmo, Ryō Kō, Mō Shihō and others. The draft was started in 1743 and was completed in 1745.
Its records were continued by later historiographers from the Bureau of Genealogies (Keizu-za) until the year 1876. Unlike the official royal records like Chūzan Seikan or Rekidai Hōan, the Kyūyō relates to the history of the people, rather than to that of the ruling class.
The term Kyūyō is also a poetical name for Ryūkyū itself.

Kyūyō, Appendix Vol. IV, No. 160: When an epidemic spread out in 1852, all Japanese officials who stayed in this country [Ryūkyū] issued rice and money to provide for the poor homes of all villages. In addition, a medical assistant gave treatment everywhere.

In this year [1852], at the time when an epidemic spread out out, the former kanshukan Shimazu Noboru issued around 450 liter (2 koku and 5 to) of husked rice to be provided to the poor homes in Naha. Nomoto … Continue reading

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Kyūyō, Appendix Vol. IV, No. 158: In 1851 a new vaccination method was established and used by all people.

Since ancient times, the method of blowing dried smallpox scabs up the nose was used in all cases against contagion with smallpox. Coming the year 1851, Uku Pēchin Kijin 宇久親雲上紀仁 of the Matsu-clan 松氏 practiced a new smallpox vaccination method. … Continue reading

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Kyūyō, Appendix Vol. IV, No. 157: On the 3rd day of the 1st month of 1851, in the 4th year of King Shō Tai’s reign, persons from Tosa province [on Shikoku] in Japan arrived in a jolly boat at the seashore of Odo village in Mabuni district

On 1851-01-03, three persons from Tosa province [on Shikoku] of Japan arrived in a jolly boat at the seashore of Odo village. Subsequently, when asked about their history and origins, they told the following: “On 1841-01-05, we set out to … Continue reading

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Kyūyō Vol. I, No. 53: Theories about the origin of dragon boat races.

It is said in the old chronicle [= Ryūkyū-koku Kyūki, 1731] that in olden times there were several dragon boats (haryūsen 爬竜舟) in Kume, Naha, Wakasa village, Kakinohana, Izumisaki, upper Tomari, and in lower Tomari. Today there are three boats, i.e. … Continue reading

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Kyūyō Vol. XIX, No. 1503: In the year of enthronement of King Shō Sei, in 1803-01-05, Shimabuku Chikudun and others from Ikei village in Yonaha district were rewarded for distinguished service, and conferred upon court rank.

Thirteen persons from Kayō village in Kushi district and twelve persons from Abe village, riding on two ships of six sails each, arrived at the harbor entrance of Yonabaru. They had previously been on official business on behalf of the … Continue reading

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Kyūyō Vol. XXII, No. 1893: On 1848-03-10 a foreign ship arrived on the ocean surface at Kadekaru village in Nakazato district of Kume Island

On 1848-03-10 a barbarian ship arrived, sailing on the ocean surface at Kadekaru village in a distance of only about 3 miles from that village. Nineteen barbarians (derogative for: foreigners) divided on 3 wooden boats came riding to the seashore. They … Continue reading

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Kyūyō, Appendix Vol. I, No.6: “Kin Ōku (Mabuni Uēkata Ankō) guards his family from Satsuma battle troops.”

In 1609, Satsuma dispatched an expedition force and attacked our country. The women all were frightened and ran away, hiding in the mountains. Daimyō Shimazu Iehisa had strictly ordered his forces, but Kin Ōku 金応煦 (Mabuni Uēkata Ankō 摩文仁親方安恒) guarded … Continue reading

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Kyūyō Vol. VIII, No. 609: The “Stone-hall of the Great Sun-Buddha” is built at Nami-no-Ue

In 1524, the holy priest Nisshū 日秀 carefully wrote down the aji letter on stone monument and erected it at the seashore of Nami-no-Ue to inform the people about the meaning of attainment of Buddhahood during life. But since there … Continue reading

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Kyūyō I-14: Addendum – The Demon of Kinjō village in Shuri.

The literary history of the origins of Ryūkyū is just as fabulous an attempt to make sense of the world as it is elsewhere. In the beginning heaven and earth were not yet divided. There was only a formless pre-creation … Continue reading

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